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Author: Shannon Hicks

New Mayfly Data Logger and Accessories

We are excited to announce the release of the newest version of the EnviroDIY Mayfly Data Logger and several new accessories: The new logger board is called Mayfly version 1.0, because it’s the first major revision to the design since the beta version 0.5 that was first released in 2016. There are also several changes to the board that make it not backwards-compatible with older hardware. Th...[Read More]

Features of the new Mayfly v0.5

A few weeks ago we released the latest hardware version of the Mayfly board, version v0.5.  Here are the all of the new features that were added to the board for this release: The board now accepts an external voltage of 4 to 12 volts.  The previous board versions couldn’t accept anything higher than 6v on the external power input without causing some overheating on a regulator and some powe...[Read More]

Mayfly version 0.3 bugs

A few weeks ago we found that some of the version 0.3 Mayfly boards were assembled by the manufacturer with an incorrect voltage regulator on the section of the board that generates the switched 5-volt boosted supply. This error does not affect any other functionality or features on the Mayfly.  The only issue is that you will see 3.3 volts on the “Sw_5v” pin instead of 5 volts. We hav...[Read More]

Mayfly boards now available on Amazon

We are excited to announce that our Mayfly Data Logger boards are now available for purchase on Amazon!

Introducing the new Mayfly Logger

It has a combination of features and capabilities that make it one of the most powerful and flexible logger platforms available.

16-channel data acquisition system

A few months ago I was asked by a researcher here at the Stroud Water Research Center to come up with an automated way to measure the voltage of 8 fuel cells.  The cells need to be electrically isolated from each other, so that requires differential measurements instead of the more common method of using a common ground for everything and then just doing single-ended measurements.  I looked into c...[Read More]

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