Welcome to EnviroDIY, a community for do-it-yourself environmental science and monitoring. EnviroDIY is part of WikiWatershed, a web toolkit designed to help citizens, conservation practitioners, municipal decision-makers, researchers, educators, and students advance knowledge and stewardship of fresh water. New to EnviroDIY? Start here

Blog | EnviroDIY

Making Big Leaps in DIY Watershed Monitoring

Real-time monitoring and Web-based tools help to strengthen the measure-validate-disseminate links in the Internet of Water chain.

New tutorial: Learn EnviroDIY Programming

I’m a scientist with a limited amount of coding background and an even more limited understanding of electrical engineering, and EnviroDIY Modular Sensors on GitHub has made Arduino framework environmental monitoring possible for me. This blog post will point you to a tutorial that is intended to get end-users like me doing Arduino framework environmental monitoring like a pro. The Arduino Revolut...[Read More]

Build Your Own EnviroDIY Sensor Station

Stroud Water Research Center recently unveiled a comprehensive manual for building, programming, deploying, and maintaining an EnviroDIY Sensor Station.

The Internet of Things Meets the Internet of Water

ConnectorSupplier.com learned the history of the Mayfly Data Logger and its potential to transform water quality monitoring from EnviroDIY co-founders Anthony Aufdenkampe and Shannon Hicks and EnviroDIY collaborator, Beth Fisher.

Construction of Water Level Monitoring Sensor Station

Our goal was to supply Comfort Lake Forest Lake Watershed District in Forest Lake, Minnesota with an easy to use, low cost, and low power system that continuously monitors groundwater levels with minimal visits to the site.

Computer Science Students Collect Real-Time Data With Mayfly Data Logger

"This is experiential learning at its best: getting kids in the stream, getting them interacting in their environment." Students at Milton Hershey School in Pennsylvania are deploying water-quality-monitoring sensor stations in a creek that runs through their campus.